Visions from the Vincents

June 13, 2008

Southern Baptist Convention 2008

Two words describe the 2008 Southern Baptist Convention: honest and encouraging.  Six things in particular struck me as provocative.

  1. The Convention chose to pass a resolution repenting of gross error in membership numbers–a decision that was mocked just 2 years ago in Greensboro, North Carolina.
  2. Frank Page was the model of humble leadership during the convention.
  3. Danny Aiken, president of Southeastern Seminary, pointed out ten points of agreement all Southern Baptists shared and then demanded that Arminians and Calvinists quit disagreeing in such an ungodly way that it is inhibiting the missional purposes of the Convention.
  4. Al Gilbert stood in front of the messengers of the SBC and challenged them to rethink how churches give to the Cooperative Program and state conventions.  I am not sure what kind of practical outworkings he has in mind.  He clearly wasn’t seeking fame in the convention.  More than that, his heart wrenching plea for parents to pray for their own children to become missionaries coupled with his own testimony of struggling to desire after that for his own children (three of which are now involved in missions) left me just short of tears.
  5. Eric Redmond 2nd Vice President of the Southern Baptist Convention preached an edifying message at the Founder’s breakfast preceding the Convention at 6:30 am on Tuesday challenging pastors not to loose the book of the law like those of Josiah’s day had.
  6. Southern Baptist elected the first American Indian, Johnny Hunt, (from the Lumbee tribe) as their president.
Advertisements

2 Comments »

  1. Several years ago, about 1994, I understand that an Investication of the Freemasons Masonic Fraternaty Was to be conducted. I am a Baptist and a member of the Masonic Fraternity here in Massachusetts and would like know the answere on this as there seems to be some confusion here in Mass. what the position of the SBC on this matter.

    Yours in Christ
    Bernard W. Frost

    Comment by Bernard W. Frost — October 21, 2008 @ 11:58 pm

  2. Bernard,
    Here is a portion of an article by NAMB on freemasonry. I hope it is helpful.

    New publication on Freemasonry available from SBC’s North American Mission Board

    Posted on Jun 9, 2000 | by James Dotson

    ORLANDO, Fla. (BP)–A motion referred from last year’s Southern Baptist Convention has resulted in a new publication by the North American Mission Board examining Freemasonry’s compatibility with Christianity.

    The pamphlet, titled “A Closer Look at Freemasonry,” is part of an ongoing series by NAMB’s interfaith evangelism team examining various belief systems.

    While acknowledging the “many charitable endeavors” of Freemasonry, the pamphlet also expands on eight “tenets and teachings” of Freemasonry that were found to be “incompatible with Christianity” in a controversial report on Freemasonry approved by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1993.

    “We decided to write this piece that would expand a little further on some of the things that were stated in the report on Freemasonry,” said William Gordon, an interfaith evangelism associate and principle researcher for the pamphlet.

    “We tried to be honest in our evaluations,” added Rudy Gonzalez, director of the interfaith evangelism team. “The document is not condemning in any way, but simply seeks to put information out so that individuals can arrive at informed conclusions about what they ultimately believe about these organizations.”

    The motion requesting that NAMB produce materials contrasting the Bible and Freemasonry was submitted last year by Russ Kaemmerling of DeSoto, Texas. It was referred to NAMB by the Convention’s Committee on Order of Business.

    The “Closer Look” provides documentation and explanation for the eight concerns of the original 1993 report on Freemasonry, which it summarized with the following statements:

    1) “Freemasonry uses offensive, non-biblical, and blasphemous terms relating to God.”

    2) “Freemasonry insists on the use of ‘bloody oaths’ or obligation, which are strictly forbidden by the Bible (cf. Matt 5:34-37).”

    3) “Freemasonry urges that occultic and/or pagan readings be used, and that their teachings be appropriated in interpreting such concepts as the Trinity.”

    4) “Freemasonry includes the Bible as part of the ‘furniture of the lodge,’ but only as an equal with non-Christian symbols and writings.”

    5) “Freemasonry misuses the term ‘light’ to refer to moral “reformation” as a means to salvation.”

    6) “Freemasonry teaches that salvation may be attained by ‘good works’ and not through faith in Christ alone.”

    7) “Freemasonry advocates in many of its writings the non-biblical teachings of universalism.”

    8) “In some of its lodges, Freemasonry discriminates against non-whites.”

    Comment by Joshua — October 22, 2008 @ 12:32 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: